Voter ID Debate Ramping Up Again For 2012

by Kris Kobach | National Public Radio

Transcript:

NEAL CONAN, host:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I’m Neal Conan in Washington.

Over half the states require some type of identification before you can vote, and many now demand a government-issued photo ID. Last week, after sometimes bitter debate, the Texas legislature sent a photo ID bill to Governor Rick Perry, who is expected to sign it.

Supporters argue these changes preserve the integrity of elections and prevent voter fraud. Opponents argue that voter fraud is nearly nonexistent and that these laws are partisan efforts to hold down the votes of minorities, the poor and the young, groups which tend to vote Democratic.

If you don’t have a government-issued photo ID, why not? Would you go to get one if you needed it to vote? Give us a call, 800-989-8255. Email us, talk@npr.org. You can also join the conversation on our website. That’s at npr.org. Click on TALK OF THE NATION.

Later in the program, the curriculum and the effects of John school, but first voter ID laws. Christina Bellantoni is the associate politics editor at CQ Roll Call and joins us here in Studio 3A. Nice to have you with us today.

Ms. CHRISTINA BELLANTONI (Associate Politics Editor, CQ Roll Call): Thanks for having me.

CONAN: And Texas would be number 11 to require photo IDs. The Kansas law goes into effect in January. This appears to be a growing trend, specifically with photos.

Ms. BELLANTONI: Yeah, and it looks like there’s going to be more on tap. You’ve got Wisconsin, this is coming up, probably. Voters in Missouri are going to have this as a ballot test to be able to say yes, we want to require this.

Read the complete transcript at NPR

Sorry, comments are closed for this post.